Filigree and Fretwork

Maybe it's a continuation of the lace trend, but I'm seeing a lot of openwork in products and home design, especially with filigree and fretwork.

 Boco do Lobo

Boco do Lobo

Both of these forms of design work have been around for millennia. Ancient Romans turned filigree - tiny beads and twisted wires all made of metal - into a fine art form. And Ancient Egyptians used fretwork to create decorative passages that allowed cooling breezes to pass through or provided privacy.

 Lorenzo Pennati

Lorenzo Pennati

Modern designers are rediscovering these fabulous open patterns for today's lifestyles, with swirling loops of metal, or laser-cut geometric patterns.

 Shades of Light

Shades of Light

The looks can be delicate and feminine like in the pendant above, or bold and beautiful like the screens below.

 Silian Art Gallery in London by Miles and Lincoln

Silian Art Gallery in London by Miles and Lincoln

I love people who are taking these older crafts and using them in new ways, like designer Julie Bradshaw who added a stunning metal fret to the cabinet doors below.

 Bradshaw Designs

Bradshaw Designs

And these sliding doors below from Summer Thornton are a brilliant way to hide or reveal the shelves in this room! Notice the classical details that speak to this trend's historical roots.

Summer Thornton.jpg

What do you think about filigree and fretwork? Let me know in the comments!

Warmly,

Beth