Velvet Underground

As an interior designer, one of my greatest pleasures is indulging in my love of textiles. From the softest silks, to roughest burlap, all textiles have their time and their place, depending on style and architecture. 

So here’s a secret - just between you and me - if I had to pick a favorite, it would be velvet. I love its shimmer and softness. I love its ability to both absorb and reflect light. I love the because of the density of the pile, it takes dye like no other textile, revealing gorgeous, truly saturated depths.

Dita von Teese in vintage Dior, Vogue Magazine

Dita von Teese in vintage Dior, Vogue Magazine

Velvet refers to the type of weaving resulting in a piled fabric, and not to the actual composition of the fabric, which can be made of cotton, wool, linen, silk or any number of artificial fibers. It’s history is associated with royalty because of the the expense of making the fabric. Even today, when a velvet gown or velvet sofa made of artificial fibers is within the range of most consumers, it’s still associated with luxury. And there a reason for that, the finest velvets available today are still expensive, with the cost of pure silk or mohair velvets running into hundreds, even thousands of dollars per yard. 

Alexa Hampton

Alexa Hampton

Velvet is one of my go-to fabrics for seating, because not only does it look luxurious, and goes with any style of decor, from traditional to modern, it’s also a very hard-wearing fabric due to the density of the pile. 

Tristan Auer

Tristan Auer

When I started in the design business, velvet was still considered a “formal” fabric, restricted to living or dining rooms, but over the last decade there has been a boom in outdoor fabric technology, and now acrylic velvets can be used in any room, even outside. Water and chlorine are aren’t a problem if your velvet is 100% solution dyed acrylic! 

Perrenials Outdoor Velvets

Perrenials Outdoor Velvets

For more velvet inspiration, please visit my “Va Va Velvet” Pinterest Board.

Warmly,

Beth