Things I Love: Upholstered Headboards

This week’s installment in my month of “Things I Love” is upholstered headboards, because everyone needs a comfortable place to rest their head. I’d say in 90% of my projects I include an upholstered headboard in the master bedroom, because we all have an in-bed, before-sleep routine, whether watching a late night talk show or reading a good thriller, and we all need something soft on which to rest our heads. 

In a traditional bedroom I designed, the frame of the headboard has a stately, old-world elegance, but the soft linen upholstery and pillows speak of comfort and relaxation, top priorities in a bedroom. 

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

The great thing about upholstered headboards is for a piece of furniture with only one function - to comfortably support one’s head against the wall - the variety of shapes, styles and fabrics is virtually infinite. I love the delicate curves of this headboard paired with the slightly rough and primitive texture of the the raffia covering. 

Thom Filicia

Thom Filicia

A similarly curvaceous headboard upholstered in a printed linen, takes on a serene and calming spin in this picture perfect bedroom. I can’t imagine a more soothing space to slumber.

Shelton, Mindel and Associates

Shelton, Mindel and Associates

Upholstered headboards can also be simple and modern, as this tall four-panel version in a stunning San Francisco Townhome. Light, bright, and simple, but still inviting.

Heather Hilliard

Heather Hilliard

And if you are going tall, why not go all the way up and channel upholster all the way up the ceiling, as in this grand yet inviting NewYork City apartment? The softness and noise absorbing quality of such a vast expanse of upholstery is the perfect antidote to the hustle and bustle of the city right outside the window.

Bruce Bierman

Bruce Bierman

The modernist in me loves the idea of doing the opposite, too, and keeping the headboard long, low and horizontal to match the lines of modern architecture. This oversized headboard, while rigorously modern, still meets the basic job requirements - a soft place to rest your head. 

Tocha Project

Tocha Project

For more headboard inspiration, please visit my “Upholstered Headboard” Pinterest page.

Warmly, 

Beth

Things I Love: Metallic Details

Nothing attracts attention like the shine and sparkle of metallic accents in a room - that's why it's one of the things I most love in interior design! You can see an example of that in the powder bath I designed below for the ASID Showhouse in Tomball, TX.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

I custom designed the pattern on the wall, which is hand painted pearl fresco with gilded details by Anything But Plain Decorative Finishes and Plasters! And isn't that sconce gorgeous - I designed it with metalsmiths Peck and Company. Add in that fab hammered sink and metal accents, and this bathroom achieves the gold standard in shimmer.

Alloy Tile

Alloy Tile

Taking a cooler route in silvery tones, I love the metal tiles above from Alloy. Chic, sophisticated, but also easy to clean.

Beth Lindsey for Brother vs. Brother on HGTV

Beth Lindsey for Brother vs. Brother on HGTV

In the kitchen I designed above for Team Drew on Brother vs. Brother, we added a more subtle metal look with a rubbed brass band around the range hood. I love that soft glow and how it warms up the cool colors in the room.

Studio Guild

Studio Guild

If you don't want to make the commitment of having your metallic motifs on the walls or in a permanent band around a hood, try using accessories. I am crazy for the bold shine in the look above, especially in that fabulous gold pillow.

For more glowing inspiration, see my All That Glitters pinboard!

Warmly,

Beth

Things I Love: Chinoiserie

We’re at the mid-point in the month of “Things I Love”, and one of the decor styles I love the most is Chinoiserie (french for “in the Chinese taste”). And do you know what I love about it? Besides the fact that it is a delicious blend of east meets west, it has also been in style for over four hundred years, being all the rage amongst the nobility of Europe in the 17th and 18th century, and still influences modern decor today.

The Chinese Museum at Chateau de Fontainebleau, established by Empress Eugenie in 1867.

The Chinese Museum at Chateau de Fontainebleau, established by Empress Eugenie in 1867.

Strangely enough, I can prove it’s been in style for centuries because it so easily passes the 10 Year Rule. And now you are probably curious about the 10 Year Rule: Ten years after a project is completed, elements can start start to feel a little dated. Times change and trends change, so 10 years is about the time we designers like to be called in for a refresh. Some of the trends might need to be replaced, but the room should generally just need a freshen, maybe a piece reupholstered that is showing some wear, and new pillows and accessory pieces brought in, but the bones of the room should still look good.

The below photo proves my point. It is from peak Elle Decor, circa 2007 - roughly 10 years ago- but the Chinese Chippendale chairs, which basically have been unchanged for centuries, still mix well with modern furniture, and still look 100% fresh. 

Bruce Glickman and Wilson Henley, photo by William Waldron

Bruce Glickman and Wilson Henley, photo by William Waldron

Another hallmark of chinoiserie style is the ubiquitous Chinese Coromandel screen, still looking as good today as when the Chinese originally started carving them for export to Europe centuries ago. Coromandel is the term for carving reliefs in lacquer, but named for the Coromandel Coast of India where the Chinese brought their wares to be shipped to European nobility via the East Indian Trading Company in the 1600s. Amazing that they still look great when paired with our modern tastes.

David Hicks (AU)

David Hicks (AU)

Demand for Coromandel screens was so high, that a new method of getting the ever-so-hot chinoiserie look was devised by imitating the look of the screens with watercolors on paper, popularizing in the 17th century what is still a interior design staple today: wallpaper!

de Gournay

de Gournay

Wendy Labrum/Luxe Magazine

Wendy Labrum/Luxe Magazine

Last, I can’t talk about chinoiserie style, without mentioning the medium which is so popular and so ever-present that people don’t even associate it with the “Chinese taste” anymore, and that’s blue and white porcelain. In the 1600s and 1700s, kings built entire wings of palaces around blue and white porcelain imported from China; it was rare, exotic, and incredibly expensive. In today’s world, we see it everywhere, from the most formal of living rooms to the most comfy-casual of family rooms. 

Kathryn Greeley

Kathryn Greeley

For more eastern inspiration, please visit my “Chinoiserie” Pinterest Board.

Warmly, 

Beth

Things I Love: Pink and Red Combos

The month of things I love was of course, inspired by Valentine’s Day, and it just so happens that the colors of Valentine’s Day, red and pink, are two of my favorites colors, and I like them best when mixed together!

A lot of people are of the belief that certain colors don’t go together, and for many red and pink would be on that list. But the fact is, with a deft hand, ALL colors can go together, and certainly anytime we look in a garden, nature tells that red and pink go together, not just well, but spectacularly!

Still if you find yourself a little gun shy, start small - like with this sweet vintage flower brooch. After looking at it, I’m sure you can imagine it going with just about anything! Just like mother nature intended.

Vintage Costume Brooch, RubyLane.

Vintage Costume Brooch, RubyLane.

Personally, when I wear the combo, I feel almost turbocharged. The pink for femininity and the red for fiery power! I’d love this outfit in any color, but the red and pink just puts it over the top.

The Zoe Report

The Zoe Report

People often think of pink as a “girl’s color," but when paired with red it transcends categories. Miles Redd decorated his living room in pink and red and had this to say: "Red is the great clarifier and adds sharpness and strength; it is the masculine counterpart to pink’s femininity. It is the yin to the yang, and gives a balance." 

I couldn’t agree more with his words, and the end result, while almost seeming from another age, doesn’t feel feminine at all. The strong jolts of black and white also help to balance things out.

Miles Redd, Photo by Paul Costello, Architectural Digest

Miles Redd, Photo by Paul Costello, Architectural Digest

Now the room below does feel feminine to me, but not in a girly way, but more like an eccentric English princess way. Often, I see rooms with too much saturated color and pattern that feel a little nervous in their execution, but this room makes me want to light a fire and curl up with a cup of tea.

Nikki Tibbles via Inside Out Magazine

Nikki Tibbles via Inside Out Magazine

I started this post (and month of “Things I Love”) inspired by by Valentine’s Day, so I’d be remiss if I didn’t post my favorite pink and red combo of them all, roses. If anyone was thinking of sending Valentine’s flowers (hint), this would be great inspiration to start with...

Carolyne Roehm, “Flowers”, Clarkson Potter Books

Carolyne Roehm, “Flowers”, Clarkson Potter Books

For more pretty pink and red inspiration, please visit my “Dynamic Duos: Pink and Red” Pinterest Board.

Warmly,  

Beth

Things I Love: Vintage Fashion

Long-time readers well know my love of fashion. Fashion gives me a thrill and inspires my work, and that's why I’ll be watching the fashion sites closely this week as New York’s Fall/Winter 2018 Fashion Week begins. But my real passion for fashion lies in the fantasy looks of yesteryear!

Charles James

Charles James

Like everyone, I love the convenience of jeans - pair them with a cute blouse and heels, and they can take me thru my day, from a job site meeting to lunch with a client to happy hour with my friends. But part of me dreams of the era when dressing was an occasion; when gowns were worn in the evening, and skirt suits by day. I’d love to take a client lunch dressed head to toe in leopard!

Jacques Heim

Jacques Heim

Vintage fashion is as much architecture as it is fashion. So much of today’s fashion relies on prints and gimmicks, but the couturiers of the past relied on seams and under layers and structure to give their creations life. And let’s face it, is there any look more glamorous than a fitted waist and voluminous skirt? I’d take this coat from Christian Dior’s “New Look” collection from 1948 and wear the heck out of it in 2018.

Christian Dior/Vogue

Christian Dior/Vogue

Perhaps the architecture of the shapes is one of the reasons that now as an interior designer I’m so drawn to the fashion styles of the past. I find them to be endlessly inspiring. I want to design a room around the swoop and drape of this look by Balencieaga!

Balenciaga, photographed by Irving Penn, 1950

Balenciaga, photographed by Irving Penn, 1950

Last, there’s no way to discuss vintage fashion without paying homage to fashion’s dream duo, Hubert de Givenchy and Audrey Hepburn. Such an amazing talent, such a beautiful muse, and the gown he is fitting on her in this photo is sheer perfection. 

Givenchy & Hepburn, Vogue.

Givenchy & Hepburn, Vogue.

For more fashionable inspiration, please visit my “Vintage Fashion” Pinterest Board. 

Warmly, 

Beth

Things I Love: Oversize Art

For the second installment in my month of “Things I Love”, I thought I’d talk of my love of art, specifically as it relates to interiors, and since there are so many schools of art I love, when choosing art work for myself or a client, I have just one rule: The Bigger, The Better. 

Designer, Madeline Stuart, Painting by Mark Bradford. Photo by Trevor Tondo for Galerie Magazine.

Designer, Madeline Stuart, Painting by Mark Bradford. Photo by Trevor Tondo for Galerie Magazine.

Some clients already have works of art they love, and I will always incorporate those pieces into their homes. For other clients, owning art has never really crossed their minds, so I always encourage them to leave room in the budget for large pieces of art as nothing anchors a room like a large painting.

Delphine Krakoff

Delphine Krakoff

A great way to bring large-scale art into a room without wondering how you’ll get the canvas through the door, is to hang multiples that will create the look of one large piece. .

Brady Tobert Design

Brady Tobert Design

Most of us don’t inherit tapestries that our grandfather commissioned Picasso to make like the Rockefellers did, but colleges with art classes have at least one sale a year of student art, usually at Christmas time, or the end of spring semester. A great way to pick up unique art for a reasonable price, and who knows, maybe you’ll discover the next Picasso!

David and Renee Rockefeller’s apartment by Daniel Romualdez. T Magazine.

David and Renee Rockefeller’s apartment by Daniel Romualdez. T Magazine.

Another great way to bring in art is via large-scale photography. If you have an eye for photography, you can even have your own photos blown up and printed for a relatively affordable price. There are also numerous sources online for fine art photographers, and you can custom select the size, remembering my one rule of the thumb, The Bigger, The Better!

Phillip Gorrivan

Phillip Gorrivan

Remember, to be creative, it’s art after all, and don't be afraid to mix your media, too. Too many paintings can be overwhelming, so in the home I designed with Drew Scott on HGTV’s Brother vs. Brother, I hung a giant East Indian latticework grille in the small breakfast area. I really loved this touch of the unexpected in a coastal retreat.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

For more artful inspiration, please visit my “Oversize Art” Pinterest Board! 

Warmly,

Beth

Things I Love: Animal Prints

In honor of Valentine’s Day, I’m dedicating all posts this month to things I love, and one of those things is an animal print. Leopard, zebra, python, antelope: You name it, I love them all!

Animal prints by their very definition are a bit wild, and whether you are wearing them or decorating with them, they bring a hint of nature, and perhaps a little unpredictability, whenever we see them. And for us Texas gals, we’ve always considered leopard print a neutral!

Doug Meyer

Doug Meyer

Nili Lotan/Vogue

Nili Lotan/Vogue

Zebra is another classic, particularly in decor. The black-and-white stripes truly brighten any style from traditional to modern. And what woman doesn’t enjoy a little black and white print in her wardrobe?

Barcaley Butera

Barcaley Butera

Tori Burch

Tori Burch

I’m not a huge fan of snakes in the wild, but I am a fan of a sexy python print! 

Mauricio Karam

Mauricio Karam

Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin

Another favorite print is antelope. So peaceful and serene. 

Steven Sclaroff

Steven Sclaroff

Lyst

Lyst

For more animal print inspiration, please visit my Animal Prints Pinterest board. 

Warmly,

Beth

What’s in a Name: Sofa vs. Couch

We designers often have a specific way of speaking, whether because of the way we were trained in school, or years of unspoken tradition. One of those traditions is we refer to a upholstered piece of furniture meant to sit two or more people, as a sofa But 90% of Americans refers to the same piece of furniture as a couch. What’s the difference? Not one little thing! So why do designers do it? Not a clue! But we all do!

But wait, there’s more! We designers have so many specific names for different styles of sofas (or couches), it can make your head spin. The sectional, as you all know, is a sofa with the addition of a second armless sofa to make a L shape. It basically has infinite variations, which is why it’s so popular for use in family rooms and media rooms - it can go from seating two people, comfortably lounging, to seating an entire party! 

Jamie Bush + Co

Jamie Bush + Co

The cloud sofa is a free-form piece, named after a design by Isamu Noguchi and popularized by Vladimir Kagan in the '50s and '60s. Its unique design is perfect to float as the sculptural center of a room.

Pierre Yavonovitch

Pierre Yavonovitch

A banquette is a sofa that almost looks like a built-in, typically armless and often running along a wall. 

Kelly Wearstler

Kelly Wearstler

A settee is a smaller sofa seating two or three, but on higher legs. Think of a loveseat in high heels.

Jean Louis Denoit

Jean Louis Denoit

A Chesterfield refers to a tufted sofa, traditionally with large rolled arms, but anything with turfing can be referred to as “Chesterfield style”. 

Sally Wheat

Sally Wheat

A chaise is basically a sofa with one arm cut off, and sometimes the back, too.  Also has been referred  to as a fainting couch, but that’s not used so much these days.

Joseph Dirand

Joseph Dirand

The below photo contains not one, but two sub-types of couches. The piece in back is called a gondola sofa, because its shape is reminiscent of a Venetian gondola. Its signature feature is an open space between the back and the seat, so it’s often used in front of windows since it has an open, airy feel. The sofa in front that has the two curled arms at the ends but no back? It’s referred to as a tete a tete, which means conversation in french. It is so named because two people can relax on either end while enjoying an intimate conversation. 

Jean Louis Denoit

Jean Louis Denoit

And I could go on and on! For more seating and lounging inspiration, please visit my Pinterest Page.

Warmly, 

Beth  

French Accent

Do yourself a flavor sometime, and google image search the phrase “hôtel particulier”. If you are anything like me, you’ll lose yourself in a french reverie for an hour or two. While we modern Americans think of a hotel as somewhere to rent a room for a vacation, or business trip, the word has historical origins in french meaning “home”, and “hôtel particulier” meant “private home”. The images you’ll find in your search are spectacular, as hôtel particuliers were de riguer for nobility and the monied class in France, from the 17th century to today.

Hôtel de Sully, Paris

Hôtel de Sully, Paris

What you’ll also find are luxurious homes that are often furnished just the way they were when they were originally built... or are they? Because the same styles and forms in use in France circa 1750, are still in use today. It’s really hard to overstate the influence of the French on interior design as French style has dominated the look and substance of interiors since the age of Versailles. In fact, the design industry has its roots in the great kings of France, as the French nobility’s demand for opulence started the first factories making goods specifically for the luxury market, like gilt mirrors, porcelain, tapestries and furniture. Some are still in existence today, like Servés and Meissen porcelain manufacturers.

Hôtel Carnavalet, Paris

Hôtel Carnavalet, Paris

The above photo is of furniture circa the 1700s in a museum in Paris, and the below photo is of a private home in Paris of the 21st century. I honestly can’t tell if the the furniture in the private home is from 1780 or 1980, but the electric table lamp is the giveaway that it’s a modern interior.

worldlocations.pro

worldlocations.pro

The 1950s photo below of Mona and Edward Bismarck in their Parisian home shows the endurance of French style. The gilded furniture, mirror and chandelier are part of the amazing collection of 1750s Rococo furniture they collected. Rococo is a style popularized in France in the 1700s that's known for fanciful carvings, lots of gilding on furniture and walls (everything really), and huge chandeliers dripping with crystals. 

Edward and Mona Bismarck in what is now the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris.

Edward and Mona Bismarck in what is now the Mona Bismarck American Center in Paris.

Here’s another view of the room as it is today. The collection of antique french furnishings, porcelain and art were all auctioned off, but the home itself remains in use as a cultural center. I love this view of the room empty, as I like to imagine how my own furniture would look in it today!

Mona Bismarck American Center

Mona Bismarck American Center

By the way, the pattern of the wood floor in the above photo is another example of enduring French style, called “Parquet de Versailles” because it was used throughout the castle of Versailles. Three centuries later, the pattern is as popular as it ever was and you’re just as likely to find it in Paris, Texas, as Paris, France!

I have so much more I want to say about French style, but I’ll have to revisit the subject in a future post. Today, I’ll leave you with a photo that proves to me that French style will stay with us, even as we move into the future...

Lenny Kravitz’s home in Paris. 

Lenny Kravitz’s home in Paris. 

Warmly, 

Beth

Velvet Underground

As an interior designer, one of my greatest pleasures is indulging in my love of textiles. From the softest silks, to roughest burlap, all textiles have their time and their place, depending on style and architecture. 

So here’s a secret - just between you and me - if I had to pick a favorite, it would be velvet. I love its shimmer and softness. I love its ability to both absorb and reflect light. I love the because of the density of the pile, it takes dye like no other textile, revealing gorgeous, truly saturated depths.

Dita von Teese in vintage Dior, Vogue Magazine

Dita von Teese in vintage Dior, Vogue Magazine

Velvet refers to the type of weaving resulting in a piled fabric, and not to the actual composition of the fabric, which can be made of cotton, wool, linen, silk or any number of artificial fibers. It’s history is associated with royalty because of the the expense of making the fabric. Even today, when a velvet gown or velvet sofa made of artificial fibers is within the range of most consumers, it’s still associated with luxury. And there a reason for that, the finest velvets available today are still expensive, with the cost of pure silk or mohair velvets running into hundreds, even thousands of dollars per yard. 

Alexa Hampton

Alexa Hampton

Velvet is one of my go-to fabrics for seating, because not only does it look luxurious, and goes with any style of decor, from traditional to modern, it’s also a very hard-wearing fabric due to the density of the pile. 

Tristan Auer

Tristan Auer

When I started in the design business, velvet was still considered a “formal” fabric, restricted to living or dining rooms, but over the last decade there has been a boom in outdoor fabric technology, and now acrylic velvets can be used in any room, even outside. Water and chlorine are aren’t a problem if your velvet is 100% solution dyed acrylic! 

Perrenials Outdoor Velvets

Perrenials Outdoor Velvets

For more velvet inspiration, please visit my “Va Va Velvet” Pinterest Board.

Warmly,

Beth

My Top 3 Colors for 2018

This year’s Pantone color of the year was Ultra Violet a pretty color, but way too specific to truly become a trend. For 2018, Benjamin Moore picked Caliente, an oddly dated shade of red (and red is one of my favorite colors, so it takes a lot to turn me against it). Sherwin-Williams picked lovely shade of blue-green, called Oceanside, but I’m just not seeing a lot of products at market reflecting this deep, moody shade.

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IMG_0321.JPG
IMG_0322.JPG

As a designer, it’s my job to select colors for my clients that are both classic and on trend, so I don’t think any of predictions feel quite right for the times we live in. Things are turbulent, the world is changing, and I think people are craving colors that are familiar and comfortable.

So my number one color pick for 2018 is something we’ve been seeing a lot of over the last few years, but still feels fresh, and that’s gray, particularly deeper shades, from battleship to charcoal. Like a gray flannel coat, it’s a classic that always feels comfortable and chic. I like to call gray the trucemaker of colors, because you can pair it with any other color, and they always get along. Always.

Steven Gambrel

Steven Gambrel

Susan Greenleaf

Susan Greenleaf

Another color trend that seems unstoppable for 2018 is Millennial Pink (or as we non-millennials used to call it, Blush). This pretty pastel is almost a neutral, and even boys aren’t scared of it. Plus, like the title implies, millennials have fallen hard for this color, and they are the generation set to inherit the world, so I think it’s only fair to let them paint it the color they want.

Chloé Negrè

Chloé Negrè

via They All Hate Us

via They All Hate Us

Last, one thing everyone can agree on is love for the color blue. The truest blue of them all, is Cobalt and I've been seeing it a lot in design showrooms and on fashion runways. It’s definitely the most daring blue, unfamiliar enough to always catch your eye, and bright enough to make you smile when it does. Cobalt truly shines as secondary accent color, or if you’re bold enough, as a main course!

Amanda Nesbit

Amanda Nesbit

Justina Blakeney

Justina Blakeney

I'd love to hear your thoughts on 2018 color trends, and for more color inspiration, please visit my Pinterest page. 

Warmly, 

Beth

 

Creating a Welcoming Entry

Designing an entry for a new project might be one of my favorite parts of the interior design process, as the entry of the home sets the tone for everything to come. From stark and serene, to homey and cozy, the entry is the lynchpin of the home, and as a space that has few elements, it’s important to get them exactly right, 

My first rule is don’t hold back.  If there is any room in the house to go for unrestrained drama, it is the entry. Every time you open your front door, you should think “Wow, I’m so lucky to live here!" And every time a guest enters, they will hopefully think “Wow. I sure wish I lived here!”

Thomas Pheasant

Thomas Pheasant

The key to creating drama in an entry is a focal point. If you are lucky enough to have a sweeping staircase or 12-foot-high double doors leading to your living room, then the drama comes naturally. But lots of entries just have a blank wall and you have to add in drama, as i did in this secondary entry in the 2017 ASID-Texas Gulf Coast Chapter Designer Show House in Tomball, TX. I brought in a vibrant painting, and created a chunky console to be my focal point in what was otherwise a blank wall between doors.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Here’s another entry where an uninspiring space was framed by bold art and a unique burl console table. A table near the front door is a must - everyone needs a place to put down their keys, purse, mail, bags, whatever you have in your hands, as soon as you walk in the door. 

Jamie Bush + Co.  

Jamie Bush + Co.  

The surface near the door doesn't have to be a table - a bench works, too! I particularly love the giant mirror in this space as it makes the entry seem so open and inviting. A large mirror is also a great trick if your entry is small or dark. It instantly doubles the the visual space and brightens things by reflecting available light.

Weitzman Halpern Interior Design

Weitzman Halpern Interior Design

Here’s a near-perfect entry way in a lovely, casual style. It’s hard to pull off cozy and dramatic, but the perfect selection of elements can do just that. A wicker chest to set your bags on, followed by a striking console and mirror in the hall, to bring the style. Just love it.

Beth Webb

Beth Webb

Last, don’t forget to look up and down. I like to use the biggest chandelier or lantern the space will allow, and it’s also a great spot to use a statement floor, as it doesn't have to match the the rest of the flooring in the house. It’s all about the initial impact...

Mark Cutler

Mark Cutler

For more entry inspiration, please visit my Entry Way Pinterest board.

Warmly, 

Beth

Luxurious Laundry Rooms

Let’s face it- doing laundry is a drag. I don’t think anyone really enjoys it, but it’s one of life’s inescapable realities. Something that really helps take the drudgery out of this chore is a beautiful and functional space dedicated to washing and drying clothes. 

Tracy Hardenburg Designs

Tracy Hardenburg Designs

Even though the above laundry room is gorgeous, it’s still functional. The best laundry rooms should always have water resistant floors, a large sink, room for laundry baskets, and plenty of cabinetry to hide things - who wants to spoil your beautiful room with an ugly orange plastic container of detergent? I also recommend at least one full-height cabinet since you’ll probably be storing your cleaning supplies in here as well, and your mop and broom need to be kept handy, but out of sight.

Speaking of keeping things out of sight, this sleek laundry room is completely minimal, but look at all the storage they’ve included to keep it that way. I really love all the hanging space!

via Desire to Inspire  

via Desire to Inspire  

Another must for a laundry room is plenty of counter space to fold clothes either above or beside the washer and dryer. I’ve seen so many laundry rooms without this feature due to space limitations, but that’s when you have to get creative like this tiny laundry room with a pull-out folding shelf. Ingenious!

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Another great idea is a fold-out ironing station, an idea from the past that has been updated with built-in outlets and a full-size ironing board. 

via PlushHome

via PlushHome

Last, you may think the idea of a television in a laundry room might be too much, but a little mindless HGTV or Housewives, can make a boring chore fly by!

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And nothing says crisp and clean better than an all-white room. This laundry space is my go-to inspiration!

 Brooks & Falotico.

 Brooks & Falotico.

For more laundry room inspiration, please visit my Luxe Laundry Pinterest board!

Warmly,

Beth

Rethinking the Fireplace Mantel

It is definitely a trend now to move away from a traditional bricked-in wood burning fireplace and chimney to a more modern and efficient gas-fueled insert. In fact, in several drought-prone western areas, the use of wood-burning fireplaces is restricted depending on weather conditions. Because of fire-danger, the entire state of California has banned wood-burning fireplaces in new construction, and like it or not, other states are considering similar regulations. But there is an upside to this new trend: by rethinking how we fuel our fireplaces, we also get to redesign how they look! The traditional mantel remains traditional no more!

One of my favorite aspects of the new trend is fires no longer have to be grounded to a hearth floor and can be closer to eye level, even incorporated into a furniture-like display wall, as I did on this Gulf Coast master suite, with the fabulous Drew Scott of HGTV’s Bother vs Brother.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design, incorporating tile by Walker-Zanger

Beth Lindsey Interior Design, incorporating tile by Walker-Zanger

I love the floating shelves we installed in the living area of this Galveston waterfront home. Are they shelves? Or is it a mantel? Well, as the designer, I can’t even decide when I look at it, so I like to say it’s both!  

Beth Lindsey Interior Design, Walker-Zanger Stone Surround.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design, Walker-Zanger Stone Surround.

Either way, i’m pleased as punch with the way this mantel-not-mantel turned out. Sculptural, yet functional, and the perfect way to make the fireplace the centerpiece and not the TV.

Another view of the fireplace, with Drew and I on set.

Another view of the fireplace, with Drew and I on set.

Even in a more traditional environment, I like to keep mantel treatments simple, spare and unusual. For this rustic Colorado Chalet media room, I found the perfect antique wooden railroad-tie, and simply bolted it to the wall, no accessories needed.

Beth Lindsay Interior Design

Beth Lindsay Interior Design

In this more formal living room, I still managed to keep the traditional fireplace simple and modern, by matching the stone color and wall paint, so it “disappears”, and then I hung a colorful, modern painting above to draw the eye. Simple, elegant, and again, no accessories needed.

Beth Lindsay Interior Design

Beth Lindsay Interior Design

I’ve been so fortunate to be able to work in such diverse styles and all of these “not-traditional” mantels are my babies, so I can’t pick a favorite, but I’d love to hear from you as to which is your favorite and why! Please feel free to leave a comment!

Warmly,

Beth

The Canopy Bed

A few posts ago, I featured a photo of the most gorgeous canopy bed by Tony Duquette in a grand Venetian palazzo, and since then I’ve been obsessed with idea of the canopy bed. Did you know they originated in the middle ages out of necessity for the nobility of the time? Medieval castles were cold drafty places, and firewood to heat them was a considerable expense, so at night the noble’s bedrooms were the only rooms heated. The fabric enclosed wood frame canopy we still use today was invented to keep the nobles cocooned in warmth during the night. 

Lit du Roi, Le Petit Trianon

Lit du Roi, Le Petit Trianon

While no longer just for the nobility, a canopy bed is still fit for a king or queen, but now with the help of a talented designer and a skilled craftperson, anyone can indulge in this luxury, even here in the great state of Texas. This vintage green bed by one of the masters of design isn’t here in Texas, but it could be because the amazing fabric is still in production!

David Hicks via Ashley Hicks

David Hicks via Ashley Hicks

Below is a version of a canopy bed referred to a full tester, as the top component of the canopy is most commonly referred to as a tester. It’s also sometimes referred to as a ‘baldechin’, from the Italian word ‘baldacchino’, or ‘cloth of honor’. In a tester, the full-length cloth hangings don’t continue all the way around the bed, just at the sides, or even a small portion of the sides. Considerably more practical for today’s homes with central heating!

Alexa Hampton

Alexa Hampton

A fun and practical spin on a classic canopy is to turn the bed sideways, so it functions as both a bed and a daybed/lounge. A fantastic trick to make a studio apartment feel grand, or a teen’s bedroom to be extra special.

Katie Ridder

Katie Ridder

Nothing dresses up twin beds in a guest room more than a pelmet-style canopy (pelmet = cornice box extending out shallowly from the wall).

Elizabeth Dinkel

Elizabeth Dinkel

Finally, one of the most chic and feminine-style canopy beds is a crown pelmet or crown cornice, is which the side fabric hanging panels swag over the bed from a miniature  “crown”. So romantic.

Vincente Wolfe

Vincente Wolfe

I hope you’ve enjoyed today’s post on the canopy bed, and if you want to know the true depths of my canopy bed obsession, feel free to visit my canopy bed Pinterest board

Warmly,

Beth

Shiny New Year

I love holiday seasonal decor, but get a bit sad when all the shiny ornaments and lights disappear after New Year’s Day, so I started thinking about ways to keep the shine and shimmer around all year long. Metallics have been on trend for a while, and show no signs of going away anytime soon, so I put together a list of easy ways to bring metallics into the home, to celebrate the new year straight through all of 2018! And the best thing about metallics in 2018 is there are no rules! Silver, gold, bronze and copper can all be mixed together, and used in every single room of the house!

I admit, I’m a gold girl - love a little splash of gilt in every room! Like this modern studded box, the perfect place to hide a remote, or stash any kind of clutter.

Laura Kirar for Arteriors

Laura Kirar for Arteriors

I love the soft shimmer of a metallic velvets, and always say that new decorative pillows are the easiest way to update a room. 

EcoFriendlyPillows on Etsy

EcoFriendlyPillows on Etsy

You can’t have gold without thinking of its best friend silver. This image of gilt silver framed fauteuils with silver velvet upholstery is ethereally beautiful. 

via La Maison Grey tumblr

via La Maison Grey tumblr

I love the idea of a collection of mismatched vintage silver candlesticks. So romantic on a sideboard or mantel.

Wild Apple Girl Tumblr

Wild Apple Girl Tumblr

Copper is making a comeback both in traditional and contemporary decor. These antique copper pendants would be so pretty over a kitchen island. 

Not On The High Street

Not On The High Street

I’d love to use this super sleek, modern copper table lamp as the sole contemporary counterpoint in a room of sparse Gustavian antique furniture.

Bluedot

Bluedot

Bronze is back, in a big way. Again, the easiest way to jump on the metallic trend is via chic pillow, like this bronze embroidered, safari influenced pillow.  Just the right amount of sheen.

Joss & Main

Joss & Main

Serious love for this custom polished bronze and gray lacquer cabinet. So yummy.

Newell Design Studio

Newell Design Studio

For more metallic inspiration, please visit my Pinterest page. I have lots of boards dedicated to your favorite metallics and shimmery textiles! 

Wishing you the shiniest of new years! 

Warmly, 

Beth

Chic Bedrooms

Though I live in a mild climate here in Houston, shorter days and longer nights still make a cozy and snuggly bedroom in which to nest extra important at this time of year. Even a beach house can be comfy and cozy with enough pillows and extra blankets and comforters.

Beth Lindsay Interior Design for HGTV’s Brother vs. Brother

Beth Lindsay Interior Design for HGTV’s Brother vs. Brother

The thought of diving into a nest of crisp linens, under a sumptuous canopy has me ready to go back to bed, though I’m currently enjoying my morning coffee at my desk!

John Stefanidis

John Stefanidis

The key to a comfortable and cozy bedroom is in the layering of generous pillows, crisp linen sheets, fluffy down comforters, and soft throws. I’m a proponent of more is always better on a bed, because you can remove layers or pillows as needed, but once you are comfy in bed, nothing is worse than needing an extra blanket or pillow on a chilly night, and not having it close by!

Beth Linsdey Interior Design

Beth Linsdey Interior Design

Isn’t this bedroom by Tony Duquette impossibly chic? Completely over the top, but what caught my eye was the thoughtful placement of a swing arm sconce inside the over-scale canopy. Every bedroom, no matter how grand, needs a light an arm’s length from the bed so you can curl up at the end of the day with a good book.

Tony Duquette

Tony Duquette

For more chic bedroom inspiration, please visit my Pinterest page. I’ve got scads of boards devoted to bedrooms, headboards, bedding, you name it! I’m sure you’ll find more to like.

Warmly,

Beth

Room With A View

There’s the old chestnut about real estate that it all boils down to “location, location, location,” but that’s an oversimplification. Location is important, but what moves homebuyers’ souls is “views, views, views!”

So how do you design interiors to enhance a view you’ve paid top dollar for? The answer is simple, as in simplicity. To quote the master of modernism, Mies van der Rohe, “less is more.” Never compete with a view, but rather enhance and frame it in the least intrusive way possible. 

Vintage classic modernism, source unknown.

Vintage classic modernism, source unknown.

But won’t leaving windows bare leave a room cold and stark? The answer is sometimes, yes, so bring the natural view inside with dramatic palms, or fiddleleaf fig trees, to frame and bring life to that million dollar view.

Michaela Scherrer. Photo: Michael Garland

Michaela Scherrer. Photo: Michael Garland

If too much sun is a concern, but you still want to capture the view, sheer draperies are always a simple, yet stunning look. They can also bring in needed softness to hard, modern, architectural features.

Naeem Khan. Photo by Bjorn Wallander for Architectural Digest

Naeem Khan. Photo by Bjorn Wallander for Architectural Digest

Sometimes, the trick to frame a view that is simply too amazing, is to treat it like it’s not amazing at all, like framing the Eiffel Tower with simple, loosely-woven linen panels. “Oh that old thing? We hardly even notice it anymore”, while inside you are secretly pinching yourself that your Paris pied a terre has a view of the Eiffel Tower!

Via Paris Perfect Rentals

Via Paris Perfect Rentals

In a Ski Chalet bedroom I designed, the view was priceless, but privacy was also a concern, so I used simple pinch-pleat linen curtains hung from a rusticated iron rod, with a lining for privacy and warmth. Again, my goal was simplicity to complement, not compete with, the spectacular view of the slopes beyond.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Last, I can’t get these windows out of my head. The key here is the architecture of the custom arched french doors-  it doesn’t actually matter what the view is outside, the height and proportions of these windows would make anything spectacular! I am definitely using these magnificent windows as inspiration for an upcoming new ground-up build project. They are perfection, right down to the double-height hardware.

Via Pinterest, source unknown.

Via Pinterest, source unknown.

For more breathtaking windows and views, please visit my “Room With A View” Pinterest board - I think you’ll find lots of inspiration!

Warmly,

Beth

Pantone’s 2018 Color of the Year: Ultra Violet

Via New York Times

Via New York Times

Many people call purple the color of passion and I have to say I might agree, because everyone has a passionate opinion about purple! People either love it or hate it, and not a whole lot in between. I don’t think there’s any color I could hate, but purple can certainly be a tricky color to work with, especially in the bright, saturated Ultra Violet shade Pantone has just introduced as the color of the year for 2018.

Via New York Times

Via New York Times

I don’t even know if I could pull off wearing a color as intense as Ultra Violet, let alone decorating a room with it, but it can be done!  Maybe if Prince came back to life and asked me, I’d certainly be game for the challenge! Generally if I use purple, I prefer moody amethysts, soft lilacs, or deepest aubergine.

Alex Papachristidis

Alex Papachristidis

So how would I recommend staying on trend using such a bright shade of purple? Simple, I’d begin with an orchid, before starting a room, just to see how you like it. Mother nature is always the best colorist anyway.

maudpichol.blogspot

maudpichol.blogspot

What do you think about Pantone’s choice? Will you be wearing it, or using it in your home? I’d love to see how you are using the color of the year, and for more Ultra Violet inspiration, be sure to visit my latest Pinterest board!

Warmly, 

Beth

Chalet Style

For me, the ultimate winter luxury is sitting under a warm throw in front of the fire while snow falls down outside, an oasis, not away from the season, but in celebration of it! A visit to a mountain chalet means days of fun and frolic in the snow, and nights of quiet calm, reading a book or playing cards with a warm drink in hand. Pure winter joy.

Peter Beard for Vogue, 1964 

Peter Beard for Vogue, 1964 

Chalets can run the gamut from stark, modern interiors and architecture, to old world retreats from another time, but all generally have elements in common: lots of exposed natural woods, rich, hard-wearing fabrics, plenty of animal touches like antlers or fur throws (real or faux), and of course, the centerpiece of any winter retreat, a fireplace for all to gather around.

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

Beth Lindsey Interior Design

At night in the mountains, I like to keep the lighting dim, so the firelight and candles dancing around the room make one feel cozy and warm, yet don’t interfere with my enjoyment of nighttime views of the winter wonderland outside. I also like make sure there is plenty of space at the dining table, as there are always extra ski-hungry mouths to feed!

Robert van der Linde

Robert van der Linde

At the end of the evening, retiring to a layered nest of a bed is a must - never too many throws, blankets and pillows!

Dan Joseph Architects

Dan Joseph Architects

Just thinking about chalet time has me counting the days until winter break!

classic 1970's chalet via google

classic 1970's chalet via google

For more ski chalet architecture and interior design inspiration, please visit my “Ski Chalet” Pinterest page.

Warmly, 

Beth